Officialization 3: Internet

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Officialization TOC

  1. Officialization 1: WTF comes next in Italy?
  2. Officialization 2: Apartment
  3. Officialization 3: Internet <— You are here
  4. Officialization 4: Stay Permit, part I
  5. Officialization 5: Picking Courses
  6. Officialization 6: Stay Permit, part II

Internet

My new apartment doesn’t have Internet yet, so this is something separate that I have to set up. I found four different Internet providers in the area and visited each of them: TIM, Fastweb, Infostrada, and Vodafone.

Each had a variety of pay-as-you-go options, capped at a certain amount of gigs per month, where you use a local SIM in your phone. For example, an average offer was around 15Gb per month for around 10 euro, plus activation cost. Only some of the shops (Infostrada I think) had cheap burner phones that you could buy to toss that SIM into.

Of course, those caps aren’t going to work for home internet that my husband and I both have to do work on. In terms of more permanent options, none of the ones available were very good (of course). In general, they looked approximately like this:

  • Around 25 euro for a reported 50Mbps down/10Mbps up (I’m sure it would be less than that in practice). Note that some websites claim that 1Gbps down is available, but this does not seem to be the case in Rovereto.
  • Installation costs of over 100 euro
  • Additional cost of over 100 euro total for the modem (spread over the time of the contract).
  • Contracts for 4 years. If you break the contract before the 4 years is up, you have to pay a cancellation fee depending on the number of months that you are short on (usually over 100 euro).
  • Additionally, TIM made you pay another 100+ euro for some bundled TV service that I obviously don’t need (and there were no plans that did not include it).
  • You need an Italian bank account to pay with. A different European bank account won’t work (i.e. I could not use the account I got in Germany that my scholarship payments currently go into).

So obviously, most of the above points are deal breakers, in particular the 4 year contract, the extra modem and especially TV fees, and having to use an Italian bank. I already have Deutsche Bank (which does have branches here), so I’d like to avoid opening an Italian account if I don’t absolutely need it for some bureaucratic reason.

Fortunately, Vodafone seemed to have somewhat more reasonable demands:

  • 50Mbs down/10Mbps up for 30 euro per month
  • 2 year contract, with 65 euro cancellation fee
  • 50 euro deposit, which allows you to pay by mail instead of with an Italian bank
  • No other hidden fees (or so they say so far)

Unfortunately, the process for getting Internet from Vodafone works like this:

  1. Go into the office, bring your ID (passport in my case) and your codice fiscale
  2. Order the Internet, and wait to receive an email, which signifies your confirmation of the contract
  3. Wait to receive a phone call to your Italian number from the technician ~3 days later
  4. Wait for the technician to arrive ~10 days later

Once again, I don’t have an Italian phone number. I don’t mind getting an Italian phone number, but I really need my current phone number for now, since that’s where my meager Internet is going through. The guy at the shop was nice enough to provide me with a temporary Italian SIM that I can put in my phone to receive the phone call. He did this for free (I’m not sure if it was really supposed to be free or not).

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My phone unpredictably turns off, registering that the battery is empty, now when the battery indicator is between 45% and 80% (used to happen at 20-40% previously). I carry a giant battery pack with me, until I can get a new phone.

Unfortunately, since we couldn’t find a burner phone at any shop we’ve gone to so far, we had to use one of our phones while we await that phone call. Incidentally, my phone has been acting up lately and my husband was supposed to bring me a new phone from the US, but it got stolen along the way. I have been very unlucky with theft lately. If it had not gotten stolen, I could have just used my old phone for the Italian SIM. (I should have a new phone coming in the next week or two, I hope.)

Anyways, we finally got the phone call yesterday. I managed to navigate this, too, in my low level of Italian understanding (which I mostly get for free from French– I really don’t speak Italian). They said they were coming on Tuesday of next week at 10:30 in the morning. (They’ll probably be late, right?) So for at least the next week we are without Internet. If it comes in on time, then it will have been 2.5 weeks without steady Internet in total, which is around what my optimistic estimates were when I was moving here.

On the plus side, I can go to the Rovereto library for free for slow Internet that occasionally craps out. It’s free to come in, sign up for an account, and use that Internet while we’re in the library (you don’t even have to talk to anyone). I do have Eduroam through my last university, but it doesn’t seem to automatically work here, and nothing else will be set up for me here until at least the orientation on September 14th.

 

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Officialization 2: Apartment

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The view from our new apartment.

Officialization TOC

  1. Officialization 1: WTF comes next in Italy?
  2. Officialization 2: Apartment <– You are here.
  3. Officialization 3: Internet
  4. Officialization 4: Stay Permit, part I
  5. Officialization 5: Picking Courses
  6. Officialization 6: Stay Permit, part II
  7. Officialization 7: TV Tax
  8. Officialization 8: Stay Permit, part III

Apartment

As a married couple moving together to Italy, we apparently needed to find an apartment of at least 45 square meters. A couple of months ago, I visited this area and stopped by some agenzia immobiliare (apartment agencies) to look at apartments. I had been in contact with one of them through email (all in Italian thanks to a heavy dose of Google Translate), and in the end decided to go with that one.

The apartment is huge (perhaps even too big for us), but the price is acceptable, and the location is central. Well actually, the location is a little too central, because there is always some noise from the street outside and there’s a popular bar below us, so it doesn’t die down at night. But because finding an apartment (especially registering everything) is such a hassle, I think it’s going to have to do. The apartment does have both AC and heating, so theoretically, we could just keep our windows closed and the noise outside won’t bother us.

In order to get the apartment, we needed to fill out the lease. An Italian acquaintance helped me translate a draft of the lease, which was really kind of her. There didn’t seem to be anything fishy in it, but the set-up costs are not cheap. In addition, since we went with an agenzia, it turns out, we have to pay them a hefty sum as well. Actually, I asked about the agenzia fee before I signed the lease and the guy claimed there were no other fees apart from deposits and so on. It’s very possible, though, that my Italian wasn’t good enough to get the idea across. It’s also possible the guy was being deceitful. He seemed like a normal person, but who knows. In fact, I sort of suspected that there might be a fee for this, since I was going through an agenzia. In the end, everything was already getting set up, and I decided it made more sense to pay this than struggle through the rest of my life– a perk of having some cash saved up. So please be aware that if you use an agenzia, you will have a hefty fee to pay.

After signing the lease, I needed to pay a deposit of 3 months’ rent, the first month’s rent, and the agenzia fee. Then the contract needed to be certified with a stamp. The agenzia will do the certification for us. In addition, we needed to go to the energy company to get electricity, gas, water, and garbage set up. Actually, these things were already set up from a previous tenant, but they needed to be moved to my name. So the agenzia guy went to the energy company together with me, to get some information (since he actually spoke Italian). Then he provided me with some paperwork, and I ended up coming back the next day. The documents I needed were:

  • Passport
  • Lease signed by both parties (doesn’t have to be stamped yet)
  • Codice fiscale
  • Bank account IBAN & Swift/BIC code (my German one worked)
  • The agenzia provided me with the forms I needed (but I think they can give them to you there as well) to switch the accounts from the previous owner to me, including some forms with information about the owner of the apartment (including his ID).
  • There was also a form with the current amount of gas used, which can be found on the gas reader.
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The gas reader (10,333 was the number I needed to provide).

After I was done, I received the bags for trash. By the way, trash here is not a simple affair. There are separate bags for organic, plastic, paper, and residuo (everything else). There’s a huge list of what goes into each bag. The bags are picked up on different mornings (we were given a schedule), and are tagged to your name. The residuo bag is particularly small, and you only get one per month. This is a problem because dirty cat litter and feminine hygiene products all have to go in there. That bag is going to be really gross by the time it can get picked up.

I will also need to return to the energy office after I have moved my residence to Rovereto to give them proof that I live here now (which I believe makes some of my costs lower). Registering your residence is done at the Ufficio Anagrafe, but I can’t do this until I have received my stay permit, which I get from the Cinformi. And I can’t do that until I’ve received my enrollment paperwork from my university on September 14th. By the way, my European stay permit from Germany runs out on October 17th… I doubt all of this will be done before then, so we’ll see how that plays out.

Costs:

  • €1410 security deposit (equal to three month’s rent)
  • €470 first month’s rent (paid earlier in the year though)
  • €549 agency fee

Portland 400

Portland 400 miles.

I’m on the road, and over halfway there. The wide, straight freeway has changed into a crooked mountain pass, as sunny inland pastures have given way to snow-dusted pine woods. Maybe it’s the change in terrain that does it, or maybe just the thought of the distance I’ve traveled, but the music blaring on my radio can no longer drown out the confused mixture of emotions that I have been struggling to contain– I am moving far away from all I know.

Coming around a bend, black rows of pine studded hills suddenly split open ahead of me. The early morning sun illuminates the pure snow-clad face of a great mountain. Mount Shasta? Like the crater-pocked face of the moon, it seems to glow of its own light. Like the moon, it is at once comforting and cold.

I’ve moved other times, of course, even traveled to other countries, but this time is somehow different. Someone told me yesterday it’s because in the past, there was always the assumption of return, even if there was no set date– this time is forever. Beyond anxiety and uncertainty, the light of understanding shines as brilliantly as the morning sunlight on the mountain’s face. Sometimes, the truth is a source of comfort. Sometimes, it is a curse.

Weed 5 miles.

What kind of a deranged soul would name their town “Weed”? Perhaps an old, bow-backed hunter, clinging to his cabin hermitage, as he cleans his father’s rifle by candlelight. Damned be any man who attempts to uproot him from his ancestral home. We cling to what we know.

I grew up in a house of books. My parents clung to them like the hermit to his father’s rifle. Overstuffed shelves lined the walls, but there were not enough walls. Books lay in stacks on the floor, on nightstands, on the kitchen table, on the kitchen counters. Any available surface was covered in books. Sometimes there was more room in the house for books than for us trying to live there. Yet “home” is neither a house, nor a city, nor a book. Home is that feeling of comfort and security that comes from knowing you are cared for. In that sense, it was still home.

It’s hard leaving everything you know, but not as hard as clinging to an outlived past. If I were to be a weed, I would choose to be the dandelion. I would not wear down the path beneath my feet, but I would travel on the wind, each new breeze guiding me towards a new life.

Portland 300 miles.