Officialization 10: Leaving Germany

My first year in the LCT master is over, and I am moving from Germany to Italy to do my second year. But damn German bureaucracy… even leaving Germany isn’t easy. Having to talk to all of these offices is like knocking on a door that will never open. Their hours of operation are haphazard, and even when you get through, you just end up asking the same things over and over, hoping someone will know the answer.

Of course, the first thing I had to leave Saarland is to write a physical letter to my landlords announcing my intent to leave well ahead of time (a friend helped me with the correct wording for this). I was lucky and had to do it just one month in advance since many leases ask for up to three months notice. I ended up owing my landlords €140 for electricity over the included amount and a cleaning fee. My lease agreement covered that so it wasn’t a big surprise, but still a bit much.

Next, I needed to go back to the Bürgeramt at most one week before I was to move in order to announce to them that I’m moving and to get a leaving certificate. They needed to see my passport for this. I guess I could have done it via email, but I ended up having time in person. Anyway, it took like half an hour, so just another small annoyance.

The worst part though, is dealing with the health insurance. So, remember when I signed up for national health insurance when I first got here? Yea, it turns out, that was probably a mistake, after all.

Here’s a thing. As a student under 30 in a German university, you are required, by law, to be covered by insurance. You can waive this requirement when you enroll. Although I had a private travel insurance through my program, I chose to actually sign up for the national system anyway, thinking that that would ensure proper coverage through some of the issues that I have. The cost was around €90 a month, and as an American (our insurance system is famously fucked up), this seemed to be quite affordable.

But now that I am moving to Italy, I would like to sign up for the Italian one to make sure I am correctly covered there. My German one is supposed to work in Italy, but I’m told the local one will still probably make more sense to doctors. More to the point though, the Italian one is much much cheaper. It costs less than €200 per year. So that means if I cancel my German insurance and pick up the Italian one, I save something like €900.

But cancelling is harder than it sounds. As I said, there’s a law that requires you to have insurance as a student under 30. Because I signed up for AOK (the national health insurance) when I enrolled, and did not sign a waiver to cancel it, I cannot legally drop it until I am no longer enrolled, and I can’t just change to a private insurance either. Also, I can’t easily un-enroll, because my program automatically re-enrolls me and waives the enrollment fee, since I have to be enrolled in order to submit my master’s thesis work next year.

It sounds like the way for me to drop AOK would be to:

  1. Officially un-enroll in Saarland
  2. Provide proof from the Bürgeramt that I have moved away, and proof of un-enrollment to AOK to cancel my insurance
  3. Get a new acceptance certificate from my department for the second year
  4. Re-enroll with my same matriculation number in Saarland,
  5. Provide proof of a German health insurance again, or a waiver for the insurance

The good news is that since I literally just turned 30, I don’t actually have to do that very last step anymore, since that law only applies to people under 30.

The annoying thing is that after living here for a year, and seeing how things went, I actually think it would have been fine for me to just stick with the private insurance that LCT provided us, and soak whatever costs from the doctors visits would have been. I think it would have been more affordable and easier in the end.

I don’t have time anymore to deal with all of this in person because I am moving to Italy today, so I’ll have to keep following up online.

UPDATE:

Actually, it turns out that since I turned 30, AOK is actually supposed to automatically cancel my insurance by September 30th. Normally, this would be a bad thing, since I think would have to re-sign up with them as a non-student or else get private insurance, which would both be more expensive.

In this case though, it seems like this is a good thing, since all I will have to do now is get the Italian insurance and send it to AOK to confirm that I have something, as I believe is legally required.

All packed and ready to go!

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