Officialization 6: Stay Permit, part II

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Part of the hiking (climbing) path to Cima Rocca.

Officialization TOC

  1. Officialization 1: WTF comes next in Italy?
  2. Officialization 2: Apartment
  3. Officialization 3: Internet
  4. Officialization 4: Stay Permit, part I
  5. Officialization 5: Picking Courses
  6. Officialization 6: Stay Permit, part II <— You are here
  7. Officialization 7: TV Tax

Stay Permit, part II

In Stay Permit, part I, I went to the post and paid a ton of money to send a bunch of documents to the immigration office. I received a receipt, on which was written the time of my appointment at the Questura (Immigration Office). In Rovereto, this office is located inside the police station. I arrived a little early for my appointment, which was meant to be at 9:34. Of course, just 1.5 hours into the morning, the whole system had already slowed down, and I wasn’t actually called in until around 10 minutes later.

Once again, the university had sent someone to help us talk to the office. I am so grateful for this, because my Italian is incredibly rudimentary, and the situation was stressful the way bureaucracy always is.

I had brought all of my documents, plus copies of them, i.e. the receipts from the post office, including the receipt for payment of the health insurance, my passport, my German stay permit, proof of funding, my lease, photos, and even some cash, just in case. In the end, they only asked for the postal receipts, my passport, my German stay permit, and the photos. They took my fingerprints, and I had to sign a paper with all my information. I looked over this paper very carefully and found a mistake in one of the dates, which they immediately corrected. It was very important to look over this information before signing it for this reason! After that, they gave me the same postal receipt back, this time with a very important “codice pratica” number handwritten on it which identifies my application.

Unfortunately, my German stay permit runs out in a couple weeks, which means that after it runs out, I am not allowed to travel outside of Italy and the US (my home country), until I receive the stay permit, and whenever I travel, I need to bring those postal receipts with me, in order to be able to legally re-enter Italy. I wish I had asked Germany to give me a stay permit for a little longer (apparently, some people were successful with this), but I didn’t know it was possible at the time.

The processing time on the stay permit is supposed to take 3-4 months, but there might be a possibility of expediting it, so we’ll see what happens. In terms of picking the thing up, since I didn’t have an Italian phone number to give them, I am going to have to check the status of my application on the Questura website (using that same code that was written on my receipt).

It sucks that I’m going to be unable to travel throughout Europe until I get the stay permit. Plus, I’m not 100% sure the legality of staying here without it, even with the receipts. I mean, the office lady said it was ok, but who knows how a different official may feel about it. The worst part of all of this is that after I receive it, we are going to have to go through the whole process with my husband, this time, without any translation help from the university (they don’t help at all with spouses). At that point, my husband will be the one confined to traveling around Italy/US. Long story short, it sounds like we won’t be able to travel together until something like April (but maybe my stay permit will get expedited and it won’t take as long as that).

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Officialization 4: Stay Permit, part I

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Alleyway in Malcesine.

Officialization TOC

  1. Officialization 1: WTF comes next in Italy?
  2. Officialization 2: Apartment
  3. Officialization 3: Internet
  4. Officialization 4: Stay Permit, part I <– You are here
  5. Officialization 5: Picking Courses
  6. Officialization 6: Stay Permit, part II
  7. Officialization 7: TV Tax
  8. Officialization 8: Stay Permit, part III
  9. Officialization 9: Residenzia
  10. Officialization 10: Health Insurance
  11. Officialization 11: Thesis Registration
  12. Officialization 12: Stay Permit, part IV
  13. Officialization 13: Going to the doctors

Stay Permit, part I

The Welcome Office at the University of Trento organized a giant officialization day for all of us foreign students, which included getting through enrollment, applying for health insurance, and sending off paperwork to apply for the student stay permit. The latter procedure is fairly complicated, so it was incredibly nice that they did this for us. I had to do things mostly on my own in Germany last year, and it was definitely harder.

Enrollment was way easier here than in Germany. The Welcome Office at University of Trento had set up an appointment for everyone to come enroll. We had to bring our passports, and that’s it. We came to the appointment, the lady there filled in some form on her computer with our basic information, and she printed out a paper that confirmed that we were enrolled. Then it took a couple of days for the websites to update with our status. That’s it.

The only trick now is that I have to pick up the student card that lets me use the Mensa over in Trento. Also, I have to sign up for sports separately, and I have to pick up a card for that from a different office in Trento. Finally, as a student, I can get a really cheap “free circulation” pass for the region, and I have to pick up a card for that also in yet another office in Trento. By the way, CS courses and language lessons are also in Trento. I’m starting to think I should have spent more time searching for accommodation in Trento.

In terms of health insurance, I had to already have health insurance that lasted until the end of my stay. Since my German health insurance is apparently running out, I used the one the LCT program provided me with for now. Italian national health insurance costs around 157 Euro per calendar year, even if you only use it the last 3 months, so I decided to just use the LCT program provided insurance until December. After that, I did pay for a year of the Italian one, because I just want to make sure that my pre-existing condition is covered. It’s cheap enough that I feel it is worth it. I’ll just have two insurances now.

Once you are enrolled and you have health insurance, you can apply for the student visa by post. For this you need:

  • A form that was provided to us by the Welcome Office, but I guess you can get it at Cinformi
  • Copies of each page of your passport, including the stamped pages at the back
  • A copy of the enrollment certificate from Uni Trento (or the invitation letter from Uni Trento or similar)
  • Copy of your health insurance policy with dates on when it is valid
  • Optionally, €149.77 to optionally sign up for the health insurance from January to December of next year
  • Copy of your lease if you have it (otherwise you bring it with you to your appointment later)
  • €16 for a revenue stamp, which you have to buy at a tabacchi (there’s one across the street from the Rovereto Post Office)

Once you have all of the above, you go to the post office, and send it all off in a massive envelope. The post office then gives you really important receipts for all of this. You need to make copies of these receipts and guard them with your life. The receipts tell you when your appointment is at the Questura (immigration office).

The Welcome Office helped us do all of this. They literally filled out the application form for us, they helped us make copies, they took us to buy the revenue stamp, they made an appointment for all of us at the post office, they gave us the massive envelope to send it all off in, and they were there with us when we paid and sent things off. This was really great.

What the Welcome Office doesn’t help with is doing all of this for my husband. He has to wait until my stay permit comes in, before he can get started. Since it will probably take at least 4 months for mine to come, he will probably have to leave Italy at the end of his 90-day Shengen Visa waiver expiration date, and come back.

 

Officialization 1: WTF comes next in Italy?

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The view from the train on the way to Rovereto.

Officialization TOC

  1. Officialization 1: WTF comes next in Italy? <– You are here.
  2. Officialization 2: Apartment
  3. Officialization 3: Internet
  4. Officialization 4: Stay Permit, part I
  5. Officialization 5: Picking Courses
  6. Officialization 6: Stay Permit, part II
  7. Officialization 7: TV Tax
  8. Officialization 8: Stay Permit, part III

WTF comes next?

Back to this again– the craziness of figuring out how to get a stay permit, now with a husband and a separate apartment to think about as well, plus an almost complete lack of knowledge of the local language. The stress levels are quite high. Anyways, here is my best guess as to the order in which things will need to get done next (grey is for spouses/children). I will probably be updating this post a lot as new information comes up.

 

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Once again, that’s a lot of stuff, and I will be breaking it down into separate posts as I get each step done. So far, I know I will probably have to visit at least 3 agencies at some point: Agenzia delle Entrate (entry), and Questura (immigration), Anagrafe (registration).

The first step is getting a codice fiscale (tax code), but luckily, my school was able to apply for one on my behalf, so this task, at least, is done. Moving forward though, there is still a lot to be done.

Unlike last time, I feel even more disconnected from everything, probably because I am an atypical student (with a husband, separate apartment, over 30), and because last time I was able to come a month early to take an intensive language course where I met other students dealing with the same problems, and participated in some social activities that cut the stress. This time, there is no intensive language course at the start, and I really feel that it’s a damn shame.